i2E http://i2e.org Innovation to Enterprise Thu, 28 Apr 2016 15:35:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 ECU students victorious at competition http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/ecu-students-victorious-at-competition/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/ecu-students-victorious-at-competition/#respond Thu, 28 Apr 2016 15:35:31 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28651 ECU students victorious at competition
© Copyright 2016 theadanews.com

ADA — Ways to improve airline and back seats were the innovative entrepreneur ideas that took first and second place for East Central University teams at the 2016 Donald W. Reynolds Governor’s Cup Thursday, April 14.

Air-Ez, led by ECU freshman Larisa Bolin of Ada and team member ECU senior Breanna Ragan of McAlester, took first place in the Small Business Division. Air-Ez is an easily attachable system that turns a typical airline seat into a safe and comfortable seat for handicapped and mobility-impaired individuals.

James Brown, an ECU junior from Shawnee, took second with Back Seat Hero. Back Seat Hero is a pressure-sensitive mat with indicator lights that signal the driver to a passenger’s presence in the back seat.

Bolin was also named a 2016 Paulsen Award Scholarship recipient. The $5,000 scholarship, named in honor of Oklahoma Business Roundtable President Don Paulsen, is designed to encourage Oklahoma’s future leaders to continue their education while at the same time contributing their viewpoints to the ongoing dialogue on key economic issues.

The statewide competition, hosted by i2E, Inc., Innovation to Enterprise, encourages team building, academic diversity, market research and financial projections as key elements in creating a winning team.

“I’m proud of the hard work and dedication these students put in. They spent hours and hours getting ready,” said Dr. Stacey Bolin, faculty advisor to the ECU teams. “These two teams felt added pressure because the successes of the teams from last year. They handled it well and achieved great results.”

Last year, ECU teams swept the Small Business Division, earning first place with Team SuiteSeat, Team Gourmet Grub in second and Team Back-Spin took third.

According to Dr. Bolin, this competition has far-reaching effects, not only for the individual students but the state as a whole.

“One of my favorite things is that the judges give constructive feedback to get our students to the next level. The goal is to impact the economy (with small business) in the state of Oklahoma,” she said. “This fantastic learning experience gives students real-world experience in launching a new business.”

Once an idea took shape, a written plan was formulated. It takes a great deal of research and includes a description of the business; industry background; marketing environment, including the primary and potential competition; operational factors; business resources; management; financial capabilities and needs; and, in the case of start-up, the breakdown point and potential.

A pitch contest was next where each team gave a 90-second pitch on its business plan concept. The key to a great pitch is the ability to describe who you are, what you do, how you do it and how much money you need.

Then came the presentation, which told potential investors the market need and solution; described the business model, product and service; size of the industry and market; marketing strategy; sales plan; competitive advantage; marketing team; funding requirements; use of funds; financials; and exit strategy.

This is the fourth straight year in which ECU has sent teams to the Governor’s Cup competition. In addition to the teams’ success in 2015, Miranda McNabb received the Paulsen Award Scholarship and Miles Mitchell won the pitch competition. In 2014, two ECU teams reached the finals and Team LockWall captured second place. In 2013, ECU Team Common Ground reached the finals but did not place. Andrea McKinney was awarded the Paulsen Award Scholarship in 2013.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/ecu-students-victorious-at-competition/feed/ 0
Oklahoma’s 1980s oil problems leads to career in biotechnology for local lawyer http://i2e.org/news/oklahomas-1980s-oil-problems-leads-to-career-in-biotechnology-for-local-lawyer/ http://i2e.org/news/oklahomas-1980s-oil-problems-leads-to-career-in-biotechnology-for-local-lawyer/#respond Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:13:58 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28646 Oklahoma’s 1980s oil problems leads to career in biotechnology for local lawyer
By Jim Stafford
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

A promising career as a securities lawyer awaited Doug Branch when he graduated from the University of Oklahoma College of Law in 1982. Oklahoma was the heart of a booming energy economy with lots of oil and gas firms that needed legal work as they raised capital and dealt with regulators.

A couple of months later Penn Square Bank went belly up.

The Penn Square collapse set off a domino effect of bank failures that coincided with declining energy prices and ultimately cost the jobs of thousands of Oklahomans. By 1988, the law firm that Branch worked for was suffering along with the rest of the state.

“Our business was in the tank,” Branch said recently at the OU Research Park. “The law business in Oklahoma City was terrible, and I knew I had to change my practice.”

Fast-forward almost 30 years. Branch recently was named CEO of an up-and-coming biotechnology startup called Biolytx Pharmaceuticals Corp.

So how did a securities attorney who focuses on the energy industry make the transition to CEO of a life science company? 

The evolution began in those dark days of the late 1980s. Branch committed himself to learning all he could about licensing and managing intellectual property and representing technology companies.

By 1988, the state Legislature had created the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST).

“I became familiar with OCAST,” he said. “My first technology project was working with a professor at OU in the engineering school who was developing superconducting thin films.”

That year Branch also began representing Sonic Corp., a relationship that continues in 2016 with Phillips Murrah, the Oklahoma City law firm where Branch was a partner until this year.

“I was so fortunate because if that engagement didn’t happen I would probably have been fired,” he said. “And it sustained me for the time that it took to develop my technology practice. Cliff Hudson, the CEO of Sonic, was general counsel then and he and I are still great friends.”

Immersion in biotech

Branch so completely immersed himself in technology that he joined the OCAST board in the early 1990s as its chairman. During his time on the board, the agency launched an ambitious plan to diversify the Oklahoma economy. 

Centers of Excellence in manufacturing, molecular medicine, and laser technology were developed at OU and Oklahoma State University. The Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance was created. Funding programs took off.

“OCAST invested big in those Centers of Excellence,” Branch said. “They were great investments, especially for the Oklahoma Health Center. It was a huge deal for biotechnology here.”

Branch’s involvement in biotechnology also began to expand. His clients have included high-profile startups such as Zymetx, Riley Genomics, Novazyme, Altheus Therapeutics and Cytovance Biologics, among others.

The construction and growth of the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park — now the OU Research Park — also added to the momentum, both for the biotech industry and for Branch.

“I opened up my office there in 2004 and it was called Biotech Law Associates,” he said. “I went to the annual BIO (Biotechnology Industry Organization) show as a member. In fact, I went to the first BIO show at the Research Triangle Park as OCAST chairman probably in ’92 or ’93.”

Now company’s CEO

Through an association with William Hagstrom of Alpha Bio Partners, Branch became acquainted with OU professor Anne Pereira, Ph.D. Pereira had co-founded Biolytx Pharmaceuticals with Hagstrom based on her groundbreaking work in developing peptides that kill antibiotic resistant bacteria. That relationship eventually led him to his current position as CEO of the company. 

“Our objectives are to develop our pipeline of peptides to the point where we can enter into collaborations with pharma companies to get through clinical trials,” Branch said. “That’s going to take time and a lot of money. It’s a great challenge, but it’s fascinating and exciting.”

As Branch looked back over the past three decades, he says he would never have predicted the rise of biotech here or his participation in the industry.

“This was inconceivable when I graduated from law school,” he said. “I mean, this industry didn’t even exist then. The notion that I would be involved in biotech, I couldn’t imagine ever doing anything like this. But I’m having the time of my life.”

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

Jim Stafford writes about Oklahoma innovation and research and development topics on behalf of the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science & Technology.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/oklahomas-1980s-oil-problems-leads-to-career-in-biotechnology-for-local-lawyer/feed/ 0
Creation of OCAST responsible for boosted entrepreneurship in Oklahoma http://i2e.org/featured/creation-of-ocast-responsible-for-boosted-entrepreneurship-in-oklahoma/ http://i2e.org/featured/creation-of-ocast-responsible-for-boosted-entrepreneurship-in-oklahoma/#respond Tue, 26 Apr 2016 13:37:03 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28644 Creation of OCAST responsible for boosted entrepreneurship in Oklahoma
By Scott Meacham
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

I’ve worked in and up close to state government. I’ve seen the good times, and I’ve ridden through plenty of rough patches, too — like the one we’re experiencing now as our Legislature tries to figure out how to close a huge budget hole.

Through it all, I’ve seen a lot of activity and self-congratulation for accomplishments big and small.

What I haven’t seen is a moment of legislative clarity equal to the moment nearly 30 years ago when state lawmakers created the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology.

Think back to that time. In the mid- to late-’80s, there wasn’t an Internet. Not only were there no smartphones or iPhone apps, it took two hands and $2,499 to hold a mobile phone ($1,399 to have a car-mounted one that only worked when the car was running).

Yet that was when a visionary group of Oklahoma legislators, as well as business and community leaders, recognized that the state needed to create more innovation and help ensure the innovation that was occurring resulted in jobs and economic benefit for the state.

Embracing a challenge

They embraced the challenge by committing the resources — immediate and long term — to create more science, more research and more innovation.

The Legislature created OCAST, and when they did, as part of the enabling statue, they required OCAST to create something called the “commercialization center,” an entity required to be a private, not-for-profit company under the OCAST umbrella with the mission of providing commercialization services, attracting and retaining technology, and attracting capital to build high-growth companies in Oklahoma.

i2E was the original contractor. First dubbed the Oklahoma Technology Commercialization Center and then, in 1998, rebranded i2E, our company began as an unprecedented public-private partnership to provide commercialization under private contract to the state.

Since then, i2E has served more than 600 Oklahoma companies. Our impact ranges from encouraging Oklahoma’s best and brightest students to consider entrepreneurship as a career through the Governor’s Cup, to providing advisory services that accelerate high-growth startups in Oklahoma, to investing capital to help those companies grow and expand.

In hindsight, voting for innovation back in the ’80s was a transformational moment for Oklahoma. There aren’t many of those in any state.

The question facing Oklahoma today is whether our current Legislature in the current crisis will have the will and foresight to continue the tremendous economic impact of that transformational moment when we stood tall and invested to make innovation an economic driver in this state.

It is easy for politicians to sacrifice the long-term best interests of our state for the immediate needs of the crisis of the day.

Oklahoma desperately needs the resource that was created almost 30 years ago to drive innovation, jobs and wealth creation in our state. 

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

Scott Meacham is president and CEO of i2E Inc., a nonprofit corporation that mentors many of the state’s technology-based startup companies. i2E receives state appropriations from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology and is an integral part of Oklahoma’s Innovation Model. Contact Meacham at i2E_Comments@i2E.org.

]]>
http://i2e.org/featured/creation-of-ocast-responsible-for-boosted-entrepreneurship-in-oklahoma/feed/ 0
Oklahoma City-based Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores announced as new signature sponsor http://i2e.org/govcup-featured/oklahoma-city-based-loves-travel-stops-country-stores-announced-as-new-signature-sponsor/ http://i2e.org/govcup-featured/oklahoma-city-based-loves-travel-stops-country-stores-announced-as-new-signature-sponsor/#respond Mon, 25 Apr 2016 14:03:26 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28640

Oklahoma City-based Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores announced as new signature sponsor
By Jim Stafford

In a night full of surprises for student participants and guests alike, organizers of the recent Donald W. Reynolds Governor’s Cup business plan competition saved the biggest surprise for last: new signature sponsor.

Oklahoma City-based Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores was announced as the new Signature Sponsor of the annual entrepreneurship competition for Oklahoma college students.

Scott Meacham, CEO of competition manager i2E, Inc., made the announcement at the conclusion of the annual awards dinner held at the Chevrolet Bricktown Events Center. 

Love’s will become the event’s Signature Sponsor beginning in 2017, replacing the founding sponsor, the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

The Reynolds Foundation has sponsored the event for the past 12 years, underwriting the cash prizes annually awarded to winning teams of college students.  The Foundation is set to dissolve at the end of this year and no longer will be awarding grants.

“My concern when I learned the Reynolds Foundation was liquidating was how could we keep this great resource for our state and its college students,” Meacham said. “The competition is too important and too valuable to lose.”

More than 1,700 students from campuses across Oklahoma have participated in the Governor’s Cup, including more than 200 this year.

“That is why I am pleased and honored to share with you how fortunate we are to have found the perfect partner in Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores to continue and build upon what we have been able to accomplish over the past 12 years,” Meacham said.

Founded by Tom and Judy Love, Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores operates fuel stations and convenience stores at more than 370 locations nationwide. It employs 15,000 people in 40 states and has annual revenue of $22 billion.

“We’re delighted to be part of this competition that celebrates the entrepreneurial spirit. Entrepreneurship is a cornerstone of our culture here at Love’s, and we’re excited to support the innovators of tomorrow,” said Vice President of Communications Jenny Love Meyer.

In the final Reynolds Foundation-sponsored Governor’s Cup, teams from Oklahoma State University, the University of Oklahoma and East Central University claimed first place finishes in the High Growth Graduate, High Growth Undergraduate and Small Business divisions.

Mito Material Solutions from OSU claimed first place in the High Growth Graduation Division.  Team members were Haley Kurtz, team leader, and Kevin Keith. Richard Gajan was the team advisor.

Second place in the Graduate Division went to Nutripeutics from OU, while WoodPro from OSU took third place.

In the High Growth Undergraduate Division, Project Pediatrics from the University of Oklahoma claimed first place.  Team members were Krishna Manohar, team leader, and team members John Dastague, Nikita Hussain, Harrison Morrow and Eli Weathers. Team advisor was Alyssa Boutelle.

Second place in the Undergraduate Division was awarded to Heart Optic LLC from the University of Central Oklahoma, while third place went to KegSafe from Oral Roberts University.

The top two finishers in each of the High Growth divisions go on to compete for an additional $118,000 in the Tri-State competition in Las Vegas in May.

In the Small Business Division, AIR-EZ from East Central University claimed the first place prize.  Team leader was Larisa Bolin and team member was Breanna Ragan. Team advisor was Stacey Bolin.

Second place in the Small Business Division went to Back Seat Hero from ECU, while Pure Golf from St. Gregory’s University claimed third place.

Other category winners recognized during the Awards Dinner included top teams from The Interview, in which High Growth Division teams sat down in February with experts in the industry category of their business plan.

The Interview winners were:

KegSafe, Oral Roberts University won the AT&T Information Technology/Communications; Heart Optic, LLC, University of Central Oklahoma won the Greater Oklahoma Chamber Healthcare; ARdecor, University of Oklahoma won the i2E, Inc. Student Generated Technology Design; Cubby Connect, University of Oklahoma won the OG&E Positive Energy and Environmental; and Mito Material Solutions, Oklahoma State University won the Oklahoma Business Roundtable Manufacturing, Material Sciences and Transportation.

Winners of the IBM pitch competition were:

Anthony Purinton, Phunctional Foods, University of Central Oklahoma, High Growth Graduate Division; Morgan Timmons, Somaware, University of Central Oklahoma, High Growth Undergraduate Division; and Austin McRay, Altimeter, Oklahoma Christian University, Small Business Division.

Winners of $5,000 Paulsen Award scholarships from the Oklahoma Business Roundtable were Larisa Bolin, East Central University, Small Business Division; Robert Gallegos Castillo, Oral Roberts University; Undergraduate Division; and Amanda Curtis, University of Oklahoma, Graduate Division.

Winner of the Robert E. Craine Outstanding Venture Award was Nutripeutics from OU. Named in honor of the late Robert Craine, a founding board member of i2E, the award recognizes an exceptional business concept presented during the competition.

The Awards Dinner was a “transformational” night for the business plan competition.  One era passed and a new era dawned with Love’s as the Signature Sponsor.

“With Love’s strong history of entrepreneurship beginning with a single startup location and growing into a national market leader, theirs is a story that would inspire any entrepreneur,” Meacham said. “Thank you, Love’s, for accepting the role of Signature Sponsor; we look forward to the competition next year.”

]]>
http://i2e.org/govcup-featured/oklahoma-city-based-loves-travel-stops-country-stores-announced-as-new-signature-sponsor/feed/ 0
Love’s Travel Stops to take over as sponsor of state’s student business plan competition http://i2e.org/news/loves-travel-stops-to-take-over-as-sponsor-of-states-student-business-plan-competition/ http://i2e.org/news/loves-travel-stops-to-take-over-as-sponsor-of-states-student-business-plan-competition/#respond Tue, 19 Apr 2016 13:53:38 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28626 Love’s Travel Stops to take over as sponsor of state’s student business plan competition
By Scott Meacham
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

The celebrations that have capped off each year of the Donald W. Reynolds Business Plan Competition have always been memorable and inspirational.

There’s nothing quite like the edge-of-your-seat enthusiasm and excitement that builds up as the college students who have put so much effort and creativity into the Governor’s Cup learn who will win the competition.

The Gov Cup winners weren’t the only exciting news at this year’s gala.

The Reynolds Foundation is liquidating and no longer will be underwriting the Gov Cup prizes and scholarships after this year.

The impact of this competition on our state and its students has been too valuable and important to lose, so months ago, we undertook a search for the right strategic partner — an entrepreneurial Oklahoma company that would be willing to step in and continue the competition and take it to the next level, building on all that the Gov Cup has accomplished over the last 12 years.

And we found the perfect signature sponsor — Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores, a company with a history of entrepreneurship that began in 1964 with a single startup location in far western Oklahoma and is now near the top of Forbes annual list of largest private companies.

With hundreds of locations and 15,000 employees in 40 states, Love’s continues to be a beacon for innovation and entrepreneurship. We are thrilled and honored Love’s has agreed to underwrite the future of the Governor’s Cup.

“We’re delighted to be part of this competition that celebrates the entrepreneurial spirit. Entrepreneurship is a cornerstone of our culture here at Love’s, and we’re excited to support the innovators of tomorrow,” said Vice President of Communications Jenny Love Meyer.

When we started, we had a vision for the Governor’s Cup, but there is no way we could have fully anticipated the enormous impact that this business plan competition would have on our state — impact that goes well beyond the awards.

More than 1,700 students from campuses across Oklahoma have taken the Governor’s Cup challenge.

The Gov Cup crosses disciplines — engineering students team with marketers and finance majors — which compels students to understand challenges and solve problems from different perspectives in a group setting.

Opening doors

Most importantly, the Governor’s Cup opens the door to a first-hand experience of what really goes on in the business world.

The Governor’s Cup experience empowers students to use entrepreneurial thinking and teamwork to create business value and breakthrough ideas.

And what better example could there be for inspiration than Love’s, a company whose country stores and travel stops have revolutionized their industry.

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

Scott Meacham is president and CEO of i2E Inc., a nonprofit corporation that mentors many of the state’s technology-based startup companies. i2E receives state appropriations from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology. Contact Meacham at i2E_Comments@i2E.org

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/loves-travel-stops-to-take-over-as-sponsor-of-states-student-business-plan-competition/feed/ 0
2016 Donald W. Reynolds Governor’s Cup Winners http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/28601/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/28601/#respond Fri, 15 Apr 2016 15:46:32 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28601

High Growth Graduate Division

First Place

MITO-compressor

MITO Material Solutions, Oklahoma State University

Advisor: Richard Gajan
Team Leader: Haley Kurtz
Team Member: Kevin Keith
MITO has developed a cost-effective nano-filler additive that can toughen fiber-reinforced composite structures using an organic polymer formula.

Second Place

Nutripeutics-compressor

Nutripeutics, University of Oklahoma

Advisor: Ronald Bolen
Team Leader: Amanda Curtis
Team Members: Chuck Burkardt, Corey Walker and Daniel Ward
Nutripeutics develops immune boosting feed additives as an antibiotic-alternative to disease control and prevention for livestock animals.

Third Place

WoodPro-compressor

WoodPro, Oklahoma State University

Advisor: Richard Gajan
Team Leader: Gabriel Bahr
Team Members: Sourabh Biswas and Samyukta Koteeswaran
WoodPro develops a sustainable, durable and long-lasting new wood composite, using red cedar sawdust and epoxy resin, which outlasts current market concepts.

High Growth Undergraduate Division

First Place

Project-Pediatrics-compressor

Project Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma

Advisor: Alyssa Boutelle
Team Leaders: Krishna Manohar
Team Members: John Dastague, Nikita Hussain, Harrison Morrow and Eli Weathers
Project Pediatrics’ Mobi is a mobile vital signs monitor designed for pediatric patients that integrates seamlessly with hospital technology via wifi. 

Second Place

Heart-Optic-compressor

Heart Optic, University of Central Oklahoma

Advisor: Maurice Haff
Team Leader: Yusuf Shurbaji (not pictured)
Team Member: Claye Hammock
Heart Optic LLC produces the Heart Bar™, a medical device that enables continuous CPR during image-guided procedures and ends caregiver exposure to x-ray radiation

Third Place

KegSafe-compressor

KegSafe, Oral Roberts University

Advisor: Bruno Teles
Team Leaders: Jonathan Cregor
Team Member: Derrick McCoy
KegSafe is a beer inventory system for restaurants and bars to prevent inventory theft.

Small Business Division

First Place

Air-Ez-compressor

Air-Ez, East Central University

Faculty Advisor: Stacey Bolin
Team Leader: Larisa Bolin
Team Members: Breanna Ragan
Air-Ez is an easily attachable electronic system that turns a typical airline seat into a safe and comfortable seat for handicapped and mobility impaired individuals. 

Second Place

Back-Seat-Hero-compressor

Back Seat Hero, East Central University

Faculty Advisor: Stacey Bolin
Team Leader: James Brown
Back Seat Hero is a pressure-sensitive mat with indicator lights that signal the driver to a passenger’s presence in the back seat.

Third Place

Pure-Golf-compressor

Püre Golf, St. Gregory's University

Faculty Advisor: Mayda Shorney
Team Leader: Brett Kennedy
Team Members: Taylor Greteman, Smaida Mara Rizzotto and Bobby Stone
Püre Golf is a “mobile” golf facility that will arrive at your venue and provide professional club fitting, video swing analysis, high performance training and event planning for corporations and companies looking to entertain clients and employees.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/28601/feed/ 0
Initiative gets underway in OKC to develop a ‘Nucleus’ hub http://i2e.org/news/initiative-gets-underway-in-okc-to-develop-a-nucleus-hub/ http://i2e.org/news/initiative-gets-underway-in-okc-to-develop-a-nucleus-hub/#respond Tue, 12 Apr 2016 14:29:25 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28594 Initiative gets underway in OKC to develop a ‘Nucleus’ hub
By Jim Stafford
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

Every workday, the Oklahoma Health Center campus just east of downtown is home to almost 17,000 people who pursue medical education or work in health care, education and research-related jobs.

When their workday is done, they go home.

Now an initiative is underway to make the 325-acre campus more inviting as a place for people to linger after work by creating places to gather, eat, drink and perhaps even live.

The Oklahoma Health Center is home to world-renowned research institutions, hospitals and the various colleges of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

In October, the Brookings Institute announced Oklahoma City as one of two pilot cities that are part of a study into developing an Innovation District. It already has held informational meetings and tours to gather ideas on just what that might look like.

As president of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Dr. Stephen Prescott has been an enthusiastic supporter of the Innovation District concept.

“One of our challenges right now is that the Health Sciences Center is not conducive to chance interactions,” Prescott said. “You don’t just bump into people. The idea here is to encourage this type of behavior by connectiveness and making places where people can meet and eat easily.”

Innovation Districts feature density in development, housing, walkability and amenities that draw people out of their laboratories and offices.

Brookings is working with Oklahoma City partners to determine how best to develop the Oklahoma Health Center campus and adjacent Automobile Alley into a vibrant Innovation District. The initiative includes the Oklahoma Health Center Foundation, the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, the Presbyterian Health Foundation, the Alliance for Economic Development, i2E Inc. and OMRF.

Terry Taylor, president of the Oklahoma Health Center Foundation, describes the ultimate goal of an Innovation District as “placemaking.”

The current Health Center campus is full of wide streets, unconnected buildings and no place where people can live if they choose or even casually gather.

“We are looking to make better physical places within this geographic area,” Taylor said. “We can create a commercial area that will be a people place and will have different uses, different commercial activities. There can be a downtown center, for instance, a nucleus for people to come together when the come to get their lunch, their coffee, whatever. The benefits will be whatever spins off from all of that.”

Brookings also suggested taking bold steps to connect the Oklahoma Health Sciences campus to the Automobile Alley to the west, which would require building a “cap” over the six-lane Centennial Expressway.

That “cap” might be a pedestrian bridge, but also could even be a more ambitious park-like green space, said Roy Williams, president of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber.

“Brookings said that will be the biggest transformation your community will ever make,” Williams said. “You will have eliminated a barrier.”

Another stakeholder is the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST), which is headquartered in the University of Oklahoma Research Park on the south end of the Oklahoma Health Center campus. The Research Park counts 43 private companies — many of them emerging startups — among its 54 tenants.

A formal Innovation District will tie all the key elements that spark new ideas and innovation, said Michael Carolina, OCAST executive director.

“An Innovation District to me means that research goes on, networking goes on, the opportunity for collaboration and partnerships goes on,” Carolina said. “It’s an integral part of growing the city’s research base, its industrial base and attracting young entrepreneurs.”

Said Scott Meacham, CEO at the not-for-profit i2E, which works with many of the state’s up-and-coming startup businesses, the “power of place” will define the area.

“I think when you look at the reality of what’s happening around us, we’ve got this power of place here,” Meacham said. “How do you recognize that and plan and foster and nurture the growth of that. I think that’s what the Innovation District is about.”

It’s clear that among its proponents, the Innovation District will serve as a hub for Oklahoma City’s innovators and, ultimately, tech-based startups. The only question is what the district will be called.

OMRF’s Prescott already is trying out the name “Nucleus,” after calling for suggestions in a newspaper column he wrote.

“I’m going to call it that until it’s rejected,” Prescott said with a laugh.

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/initiative-gets-underway-in-okc-to-develop-a-nucleus-hub/feed/ 0
Innovators & Entrepreneurs: Seed fund plants success in Oklahoma http://i2e.org/news/innovators-entrepreneurs-seed-fund-plants-success-in-oklahoma/ http://i2e.org/news/innovators-entrepreneurs-seed-fund-plants-success-in-oklahoma/#respond Tue, 12 Apr 2016 14:24:16 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28596 Innovators & Entrepreneurs: Seed fund plants success in Oklahoma
By Scott Meaham
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

Black Mesa in the Panhandle is the highest and driest place in Oklahoma.

Black Mesa used to be considered a no-man’s land. Paleontologists went there to look for dinosaur bones. It’s the harshest, coldest place in the state.

And yet, the flora and fauna reported in the Black Mesa are unique — some of these are not found anywhere else in the country. Species have adapted to the harsh climatic conditions. Hikers and visitors to Black Mesa Nature Preserve can look for more than 60 species of butterflies and 50-plus species of birds (and nine types of snakes, if so inclined).

Ten years ago, Oklahoma’s landscape for seed capital was like Black Mesa. We were high and dry. There was no venture capital money here. SeedStep Angels hadn’t been organized yet. Entrepreneurs simply didn’t have access to the investment capital to fund the milestones that move young companies from concept to startup to potential successes in the marketplace.

Then, the state embarked on an experiment — the Oklahoma Seed Capital Fund. The fund recently passed the eight-year mark. It’s a seed capital success story.

More than 26 Oklahoma companies have received investments totaling more than $12.7 million. That Seed Fund investment leveraged another $48 million in co-investment at the deal level, and more than $161 million in total leverage — better than 12-to-1 ratio.

Twelve Oklahoma companies receiving $4.5 million in i2E seed funding have had a direct economic impact of $37.3 million and an indirect impact of $11.8 million.

Every Oklahoman is impacted by the rate of new business starts in this state.

Nearly all net new jobs in the U.S. economy over the last 20 years have come from new companies. Those new companies come from the 50 percent of startups that survive five years are more.

And it’s not only access to early stage capital that helps that 50 percent succeed.

Research indicates that failure rates among startups is caused primarily by lack of proper planning and lack of capitalization.

A Washington State study reported that the five-year survival rate for companies that received both capital and business assistance was 90 percent. A study by Harvard Business School indicated that the participation of angel investors (angels mentor and provide hands-on help, as well as funds) increased new firm survival rates by 27 percent.

In Oklahoma, we tackle both challenges — the Seed Fund, other i2E-managed funds, SeedStep Angels, and our new Angel Fund source capital. And that capital is then teamed with i2E’s venture advisory and entrepreneurial development services.

The Seed Capital Fund has invested in companies from the metro areas of Tulsa and Oklahoma City to Stillwater, Shawnee and beyond.

We don’t have a startup in Black Mesa yet, but if some entrepreneur has an idea, we’re certainly open to new frontiers.

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

Scott Meacham is president and CEO of i2E Inc., a nonprofit corporation that mentors many of the state’s technology-based startup companies. i2E receives state appropriations from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology. Contact Meacham at i2E_Comments@i2E.org.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/innovators-entrepreneurs-seed-fund-plants-success-in-oklahoma/feed/ 0
Robert E Craine Outstanding Venture Award winner http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/robert-e-craine-outstanding-venture-award-winner/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/robert-e-craine-outstanding-venture-award-winner/#respond Mon, 11 Apr 2016 21:12:43 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28592 Robert E Craine Outstanding Venture Award winner

Robert E. Craine was a founding board member and chairmen to i2E, Inc. Because of his dedication to the Governor’s Cup and entrepreneurship across the state, the i2E board felt it fitting to recognize an exceptional business concept with the Outstanding Venture Award.

This year’s Robert E Craine Outstanding Venture Award winner is Nutripeutics.

Nutripeutics develops immune boosting feed additives as an antibiotic-alternative to disease control and prevention for livestock animals. The team is led by OBR Paulsen Scholarship award winner Amanda Curtis and team members Chuck Burkardt, Corey Walker and Daniel Ward.

NUTRIPEUTICS
University of Oklahoma
Team Leader: Amanda Curtis
Team Members: Chuck Burkardt, Corey Walker and Daniel Ward
Nutripeutics develops immune boosting feed additives as an antibiotic-alternative to disease control and prevention for livestock animals.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/robert-e-craine-outstanding-venture-award-winner/feed/ 0
Dozens of startups are helping build OKC’s national reputation http://i2e.org/news/dozens-of-startups-are-helping-build-okcs-national-reputation/ http://i2e.org/news/dozens-of-startups-are-helping-build-okcs-national-reputation/#respond Mon, 11 Apr 2016 16:57:33 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28586 Dozens of startups are helping build OKC’s national reputation
By Jim Stafford
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

A fast-growing Oklahoma City startup named WeGoLook has established itself as a pioneering crowd-sourcing business trailblazer, creating a market where there literally wasn’t one before.

WeGoLook is one of dozens of new ventures that have helped build Oklahoma City’s reputation on the national scene as an emerging center for startups.

In the past two years, Oklahoma City has been ranked the nation’s No. 1 city by CNN/Money for a Business-Friendly Environment, the No. 1 Best City to Start a Business by Kiplinger magazine and No. 1 among Cities Worth Moving to if You Want to Launch a Business by Entrepreneur magazine.

WeGoLook got its start back in 2009 when Robin Smith and her co-founders, Mat Smith and Mark Caywood puzzled over the problem of how to verify an item before buying it online. There was no way to ensure that a distant piece of property, vehicle or electronic bought on an online auction was actually as it was listed.

So, the trio decided to invent a way. They called it WeGoLook. The company would use contract workers it calls “Lookers” from across the country to go inspect property or real estate, take photos, write a report and file it online. Think, “Uber of Inspections.”

Buyers would pay a nominal fee and be able to access the report and photos online, as well, armed with information they wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

Robin Smith, now the company’s CEO, spells out how it works:

“You’d like to purchase a pinball machine on eBay that is located in Kentucky but you are in California,” Smith said. “You’re not sure if the listing is real or if the item is represented correctly. You would simply purchase a WeGoLook report and our Looker closest to the pinball machine would take multiple current photos, video a working demonstration plus answer any custom questions you may have.”

WeGoLook and the Looker accepting the job split the fees that begins at only $69 for a basic report.

By 2012, WeGoLook had 7,400 Lookers nationwide and two full-time employees at its downtown Oklahoma City location. Fast forward to the end of February of this year as the company boasts more than 24,000 Lookers and 83 full-time employees.

Robin Smith calls it the “sharing economy or gig-economy,” similar to that of the ride-sharing philosophy of Uber and its worldwide fleet of contract drivers. Individual Lookers across the nation, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia, are offered jobs in their area via a mobile app and can decide to accept them or ignore them.

WeGoLook offers a broad menu of services, including property, auto heavy equipment and marine inspections, as well as custom tasks such as researching and picking up documents from a jurisdiction or police report, notary, shipping and pickup and delivery.

Enterprise customers now include some of the nation’s top financial services and insurance companies, along with eBay motors and other large auto and equipment auction businesses who utilize WeGoLook for “On-Demand Inspections” while supplementing their own labor force with Lookers.

Locally, i2E and other Oklahoma investors bought into the concept early on. In the fall of 2014, i2E led an investment in WeGoLook of almost $2 million that also included Oklahoma Angel investors.

For Oklahoma City, the emergence of WeGoLook and other startups shows that the city’s renaissance over the past two decades has created an environment where entrepreneurs such as Robin Smith want to grow their businesses, said Scott Meacham, CEO of i2E Inc., a not-for-profit that provides investment capital and business advice to new ventures.

“The thing I think of that is most important about Oklahoma City is it is a community that has shown a willingness to invest in itself and dream big,” Meacham said “And you are not going to accomplish big things if you don’t dream big.”

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/dozens-of-startups-are-helping-build-okcs-national-reputation/feed/ 0
2016 Governor’s Cup Finalists http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-governors-cup-finalists/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-governors-cup-finalists/#respond Fri, 08 Apr 2016 00:49:00 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28579 Small Business Division:
Tailored Textbooks, 8:30-9:30
Air-Ez, 9:30-10:30
Fresh Fusion, 10:30-11:30
Back Seat Hero, 11:30-12:30
Pure Golf, 1:00-2:00
Altimeter, 2:00-3:00

For team bios and information, click here.

High Growth Division — Undergraduate:
Project Pediatrics, 8:30-9:30
Wedding Views, 9:30-10:30
Heart Optic, 10:30-11:30
CP Compliance Tech, 11:30-12:30
Somaware, 1:00-2:00
Kegsafe, 2:00-3:00

For team bios and information, click here.

High Growth Division — Graduate:
Phunctional Foods, 8:30-9:30
MITO Material Solutions, 9:30-10:30
Edgeworthy Technologies, 10:30-11:30
WoodPro, 11:30-12:30
VolunteerMe, 1:00-2:00
Nutripeutics, 2:00-3:00
MileagePro, 3:00-4:00

For team bios and information, click here.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-governors-cup-finalists/feed/ 0
Oklahoma researchers find clues to the origins of lupus http://i2e.org/news/oklahoma-researchers-find-clues-to-the-origins-of-lupus/ http://i2e.org/news/oklahoma-researchers-find-clues-to-the-origins-of-lupus/#respond Tue, 05 Apr 2016 14:17:13 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28573 Read more]]> Oklahoma researchers find clues to the origins of lupus
By Sheri Hawkins
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

In a new research study, scientists from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have helped identify more than 1,000 genetic variants that may play a role in whether a person develops the autoimmune disease lupus.

Going forward, these new findings could play a key role in tailoring treatments for individuals who suffer from or are at an increased risk for lupus, a disease in which the immune system becomes unbalanced and attacks the body’s own tissues. Lupus can result in damage to the joints, skin, kidneys, heart and lungs.

In the new study, scientists analyzed biological samples donated by 1,700 lupus patients.

“The patient contributions — DNA and blood samples — are vitally important to our work,” said Dr. Patrick Gaffney, who holds the J.G. Puterbaugh Chair in Medical Research at OMRF and was one of the two senior authors of the paper.

“Without them, we couldn’t do any of these genetic studies.”

Working with scientists at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, the University of Southern California, UCLA and the Universite Catholique de Louvain in Belgium, the researchers specifically identified 1,206 DNA variations in 16 regions of the human genome with ties to increased risk of developing lupus.

“This study gave us more precise information about these variants and how they influence the immune response,” said Gaffney, who is a member of OMRF’s Arthritis and Clinical Immunology Research Program. “It could someday allow us to look at individuals and the kind of variants they carry and make predictions about who’s going to have a higher risk of developing lupus.”

More than 16,000 people are diagnosed with lupus in the U.S. each year.

According to the Lupus Foundation of America, the disease affects as many as 1.5 million Americans and 5 million people worldwide.

The results of the study, which was published in the scientific journal eLife, may also help scientists better understand other autoimmune diseases,
conditions in which the body also mistakenly attacks its own tissues. Those diseases include multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome and Type 1 diabetes.

Other OMRF scientists who participated in the project included Dr. Judith James, Swapan Nath, Graham Wiley and Jennifer Kelly.

Funding for this research was provided by grant RC2AR058959 from the National Institute of Autoimmune, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, a part of the National Institutes of Health.

Read the story at NewsOK.com.

Shari Hawkins is senior public affairs specialist for OMRF.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/oklahoma-researchers-find-clues-to-the-origins-of-lupus/feed/ 0
State bioscience community gathers to praise industry growth, leaders http://i2e.org/news/state-bioscience-community-gathers-to-praise-industry-growth-leaders/ http://i2e.org/news/state-bioscience-community-gathers-to-praise-industry-growth-leaders/#respond Tue, 05 Apr 2016 13:50:34 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28567 State bioscience community gathers to praise industry growth, leaders
By Scott Meacham
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

It’s a rare moment that the leaders and scientists of Oklahoma’s bioscience industry can come together to share the collaborative spirit that is such a part of who they are and what they are creating. The annual OKBIO Summit and BioScience Awards dinner is one of those moments.

I was struck by how there’s virtually no stopping the conversation at this event — even while the OU-Texas A&M Sweet 16 game streamed during dinner to a big screen. (Bioscience and basketball are definitely compatible.)

The theme of the day was the impact of the convergence of biopharmaceutical research and clinical trials — in other words, creating clinical trials that further ground-breaking diagnostics and therapies that can change patients’ lives.

OMRF president cited

Dr. Stephen M. Prescott, president of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF), was honored with this year’s Hall of Fame Leadership Award.

Under Dr. Prescott’s leadership, OMRF has carried out the largest expansion in its history, including the opening of the Multiple Sclerosis Center of Excellence, more than a dozen new laboratories, and the expansion of cancer research, working closely with OU’s Stephenson Cancer Center to bring new therapies to patients in Oklahoma and beyond.

Prescott is an enthusiastic supporter of the ongoing initiative to create an Innovation District within the Oklahoma Health Center campus. “In the last decade, we’ve taken tremendous strides in growing the bioscience community in Oklahoma,” said Prescott, who came to OMRF in 2006 from the University of Utah. “With the Innovation District initiative, we have a chance build something transformative, to use this momentum to take Oklahoma City to the next level when it comes to creativity and entrepreneurship.”

OCAST gets award

The Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) received the Community Recognition Award. OCAST is Oklahoma’s go-to source of funding for basic and applied R&D ($10 million annually). OCAST’s Intern Partnership Program connects more than 280 students per year with science and technology companies for a real world experience that helps drive more of our young talent toward STEM (science, technology engineering, and math).

Researcher honored

Anne Pereira, founder and chief scientific officer of Biolytx Pharmaceutical, received the Researcher Recognition Award. Through her research, Dr. Pereira has identified and developed antimicrobial peptides to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This course of discovery is not for the faint of heart; Pereira has been at it for more than 20 years; Biolytx is nearing the threshold of clinical trials.

Cytovance Biologics was recognized as an Innovation Winner. The firm, an Oklahoma-grown biopharmaceutical contract manufacturer founded in 2003, employs almost 200 people and was recently acquired.

From the day’s agenda to the evening’s awards, the OKBIO Summit underscored the research, clinical trials, and science-based startups that are creating national recognition of Oklahoma’s bioscience scene.

Read the story at the Oklahoman.

Scott Meacham is president and CEO of i2E Inc., a nonprofit corporation that mentors many of the state’s technology-based startup companies. i2E receives state appropriations from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology. Contact Meacham at i2E_Comments@i2E.org.

Did You Know?
OCAST has supported more than 2,500 research and development projects in Oklahoma.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/state-bioscience-community-gathers-to-praise-industry-growth-leaders/feed/ 0
eBay Motors and WeGoLook Partner to Provide Onsite Inspections for Vehicles http://i2e.org/news/ebay-motors-and-wegolook-partner-to-provide-onsite-inspections-for-vehicles/ http://i2e.org/news/ebay-motors-and-wegolook-partner-to-provide-onsite-inspections-for-vehicles/#respond Mon, 04 Apr 2016 16:56:18 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28564 eBay Motors and WeGoLook Partner to Provide Onsite Inspections for Vehicles
By eBay News Team
Copyright © 1995-2016 eBay Inc.

With shoppers’ trust at the forefront, eBay has continued to focus on improving the selling and buying experience. Underlining this effort, the company has partnered with WeGoLook to provide eBay Motors vehicle shoppers with on-site inspections for any vehicle, motorcycle, RV, powersport or boat in the U.S., at a discounted rate as low as $69 per inspection.

Through this partnership, eBay Motors vehicle sellers can improve buyer confidence in vehicle transactions by providing on-site inspections conducted by a third party. Shoppers can also useWeGoLook’s services to ensure online vehicle postings are verified, putting their minds at ease prior to making a purchase. This service is especially beneficial for shoppers purchasing vehicles outside state lines, which is more than half of all of cars and trucks sold on eBay Motors in the U.S.[1]

“When shopping for vehicles online, consumers want the same convenience and services they have become accustomed to receiving when buying clothing or electronics,” said Jay Hanson, eBay’s Vice President of North America Merchandising, Hard Goods. “With WeGoLook, we’re providing customers with an additional peace-of-mind when they buy on eBay.”

How WeGoLook works:

  • Through direct integration of WeGoLook on eBay Motors’ vehicle listings, buyers seamlessly select the ‘Order inspection from WeGoLook’ option
  • WeGoLook dispatches a local, background-checked, certified Agent (“Looker”) to verify the seller’s claims
  • WeGoLook collects dynamic data through photos and videos of the vehicle within three business days of dispatch

For eBay shoppers, WeGoLook auto reports start at $69 and include current photos, VIN and make/model verification, and an odometer reading. Buyers can also purchase additional information (ranging from $159 – $199) about the vehicle including: video demos and tours, photos, diagnostic and collision checks, test drives and more

This initiative, along with eBay’s Assurant Protection Plan and Vehicle Purchase Protection – which covers up to $50,000 for vehicle non-delivery, missing title or major undisclosed defects – enables increased buyer confidence and solidifies the company’s position as the most trusted online marketplace.

For more information on eBay Motors and WeGoLook, please visit www.wegolook.com/ebay

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/ebay-motors-and-wegolook-partner-to-provide-onsite-inspections-for-vehicles/feed/ 0
Three OSU teams make Governor’s Cup finals http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/three-osu-teams-make-governors-cup-finals/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/three-osu-teams-make-governors-cup-finals/#respond Mon, 04 Apr 2016 16:52:07 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28562 Read more]]> Three OSU teams make Governor’s Cup finals
By Ariel West
© 2016 – Spears School of Business @ Oklahoma State University

The School of Entrepreneurship at Oklahoma State University has three teams in the High Growth division finals of Innovation to Enterprise’s statewide Donald W. Reynolds Governor’s Cup Competition.

The OSU finalists are: Haley Kurtz and Kevin Keith with MITO Material Solutions, coached by Richard Gajan, Thoma Family clinical assistant professor of OSU’s School of Entrepreneurship; Rhyder Robison, Eliot Bush and Santosh Padakanti with Volunteer Me, coached by David Thomison, clinical assistant professor of OSU’s School of Entrepreneurship and George Kaiser Family Foundation endowed chair, and Gabriel Bahr, Sourabh Biswas and Samyukta Koteeswaran with WoodPro, also coached by Gajan.

MITO has developed a cost-effective nano-filler additive that can toughen fiber-reinforced composite structures using an organic polymer formula.

“Thanks to the support we have received from the OSU Entrepreneurship and Material Science departments, our team is one step closer to fully commercializing our technology,” Kurtz said. “We are very excited about participating in the 2016 Governor’s Cup and wish the best to the other OSU ventures.”

Volunteer Me aids private school administrations in recruiting, tracking, coordinating and verifying volunteer services through their student bodies.

“To go through such a competitive process and receive feedback from industry leaders in an amazing opportunity to move forward with our entrepreneurial dreams,” Robison said. “This competition was a great learning experience.”

WoodPro has developed a sustainable, durable and long-lasting new wood composite, using red cedar sawdust and epoxy resin, which outlasts current market concepts.

“Our team is very excited to be a part of the Governor’s Cup,” Bahr said. “We have spent countless hours on and off campus to put our business plan together. Our team’s knowledge has grown a lot over the past few months alone. With this future competition looming, we plan to put out a great business plan and future product down the road.”

The final competition consists of a 20-minute investor presentation about each team’s business opportunity and will occur April 7-8 at i2E in Oklahoma City. The winners will be announced at the Governor’s Cup awards dinner at 5 p.m. April 14 at the Chevy Bricktown Events Center in Oklahoma City.

“The Governor’s Cup is a very competitive state-wide competition and we are thrilled to be involved,” Gajan said. “I’m very proud of the hard work our students performed and the progress they have made.”

OSU has had past success in the Governor’s Cup. Student startup Roll-to-Roll Technologies won second place in the High Growth Division in 2013, and other cash-award category winners include Infinite Composites and Medishine.

Innovation to Enterprise (i2E) is a nationally recognized, private, not-for-profit organization founded in 1998 and focuses on growing innovative small businesses in Oklahoma. Its mission is investing in entrepreneurs to build successful high-growth companies in Oklahoma and making a positive impact on the state’s economy.

The Donald W. Reynolds Governor’s Cup is a statewide collegiate business plan competition that simulates the real world process of researching a market, writing a business plan and making a presentation to potential investors. In the 11-year history of the competition, $1.5 million in cash, $80,000 in scholarships and $221,000 in fellowships have been awarded, and more than 1500 college students from 31 statewide campuses have participated.

Read the story at the Spears School of Business News.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/three-osu-teams-make-governors-cup-finals/feed/ 0
Inc Magazine: WeGoLook is a company to get excited about http://i2e.org/news/inc-magazine-wegolook-is-a-company-to-get-excited-about/ http://i2e.org/news/inc-magazine-wegolook-is-a-company-to-get-excited-about/#respond Fri, 01 Apr 2016 21:14:02 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28560 http://i2e.org/news/inc-magazine-wegolook-is-a-company-to-get-excited-about/feed/ 0 OKBio Summit speaker shares tale of how clinical trial was a lifesaver http://i2e.org/news/okbio-summit-speaker-shares-tale-of-how-clinical-trial-was-a-lifesaver/ http://i2e.org/news/okbio-summit-speaker-shares-tale-of-how-clinical-trial-was-a-lifesaver/#respond Wed, 30 Mar 2016 13:54:16 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28544 OKBio Summit speaker shares tale of how clinical trial was a lifesaver
By Jim Stafford
Copyright © 2016, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

The Oklahoma Bioscience Association on Thursday put a human face on the work of health care professionals and scientists involved in research and clinical trials.

Suleika Jaouad, 27, shared her story at the annual OKBio Summit of how a clinical trial four years ago rescued her from what appeared to be a losing battle with leukemia.

The theme of the summit, held at the Embassy Suites Downtown Medical Center, was “Research in Your Own Backyard: Evaluating the Science of Clinical Trials.

Jaouad also was keynote speaker for the annual BioScience Awards Dinner on Thursday evening.

In 2012, Jaouad was 22 and had just started a new job in Paris as a paralegal for a law firm there. Then she got sick but was not correctly diagnosed for several months.

“I had a rare bone marrow disorder called myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, and by the time of my diagnosis it had turned into acute myelogenous leukemia,” Jaouad said.

Jaouad was hospitalized and placed on chemotherapy in an attempt to put the cancer into remission. It didn’t work and the leukemia became even more aggressive.

“At that point we had to re-evaluate our options and were at a bit of a crossroads,” she said. “That’s when the idea of a clinical trial was brought up to me.”

Ultimately, Jaouad enrolled in a trial that involved a combination therapy of two types of chemotherapy treatments. Within six months her cancer was in remission enough to allow her to undergo a lifesaving bone marrow transplant.

Jaouad wrote about her experience in an award-winning blog and video series called “Life, Interrupted” on the New York Times website.

“When I first heard the words ‘clinical trial,’ my first reaction was ‘I don’t want to do that,’ ” she said. “My future was already so uncertain as it was that the last thing I wanted was a trial. I wanted a certain cure. I wanted to know that the treatment I was doing was worth the havoc they were wreaking.”

It took a certain amount of faith to step out and participate in the trial.

“At that point, you put your faith in your doctors, you put your faith in the power in scientific research, you put your faith in to whatever you believe in and hope for the best,’ she said. “And that’s what I chose to do.”

Now cancer free, it has been four years since Jaouad underwent the bone marrow transplant and two years since her last round of chemotherapy.

She said the purpose of her Oklahoma City appearance was to put a face to the numbers that researchers deal with in their labs every day.

“I think it’s easy to lose sight of why you do what you do when you work in an office or a lab,” she said. “My hope is to connect them back to that patient’s voice and provide them with some inspiration and a narrative of someone who has directly benefited from what they do.”

In opening the Bio Summit, Scott Meacham, i2E Inc. president and CEO, said that more than 700 clinical trials are currently under way in Oklahoma across a broad spectrum of health care conditions.

“Without the willingness of individuals to participate in these trials like our guest speaker today, medical research cannot advance,” Meacham said. “These studies provide promise for improving disease outcomes and providing better health for future generations.”

Read the full story at NewsOK.com.

]]>
http://i2e.org/news/okbio-summit-speaker-shares-tale-of-how-clinical-trial-was-a-lifesaver/feed/ 0
2016 High Growth Graduate Finalists http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-high-growth-graduate-finalists/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-high-growth-graduate-finalists/#respond Tue, 29 Mar 2016 21:16:52 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28540 EDGEWORTHY TECHNOLOGIES
University of Tulsa
Faculty Advisor: Claire Cornell
Team Leader: Leon Wunsch
Team Members: Opeoluwa Oyewole, Victoria Redding and Jared Starkweather
Edgeworthy Technologies sells patented ventilation and cooling systems for heavy sports apparel that increases comfort for users.

MILEAGEPRO
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Faculty Advisor: Lisa Thiessen
Team Leader: Jessica Penner
Team Members: Madison Cochran, Coalter Thornton and Jacy Steele
MileagePro provides fleet and transportation management software for small and mid-sized businesses designed to cut costs while dramatically increasing record keeping accuracy and efficiency.

MITO MATERIAL SOLUTIONS
Oklahoma State University
Faculty Advisor: Richard Gajan
Team Leader: Haley Kurtz
Team Member: Kevin Keith
MITO has developed a cost-effective nano-filler additive that can toughen fiber-reinforced composite structures using an organic polymer formula.

NUTRIPEUTICS
University of Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Ronald Bolen
Team Leader: Amanda Curtis
Team Members: Chuck Burkardt, Corey Walker and Daniel Ward
Nutripeutics develops immune boosting feed additives as an antibiotic-alternative to disease control and prevention for livestock animals.

PHUNCTIONAL FOODS, LLC
University of Central Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Maurice Haff
Team Leader: Kritika Shakya
Team Members: Anthony Purinton and Karan Singh
Phuntional Foods develops a gluten-free, nutrient-dense flour alternative called Nutramill™, a trademarked formula high in calcium, phosphorus, iron, protein, fiber, prebiotics and resistant starch.

VOLUNTEER ME
Oklahoma State University
Faculty Advisor: David Thomison
Team Leader: Rhyder Robison
Team Members: Eliot Bush and Santosh Padakanti
Volunteer Me aids private school administrations in recruiting, tracking, coordinating and verifying volunteer services through their student bodies.

WOODPRO
Oklahoma State University
Faculty Advisor: Richard Gajan
Team Leader: Gabriel Bahr
Team Members: Sourabh Biswas and Samyukta Koteeswaran
WoodPro develops a sustainable, durable and long-lasting new wood composite, using red cedar sawdust and epoxy resin, which outlasts current market concepts.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-high-growth-graduate-finalists/feed/ 0
2016 Undergraduate High Growth Semifinalists http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-undergraduate-high-growth-semifinalists/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-undergraduate-high-growth-semifinalists/#respond Tue, 29 Mar 2016 20:56:45 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28538 ARDECOR
University of Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Douglas Woodward
Team Leader: Matthew Dumas
Team Members: Trey Burchfield and Vince Cordry
ARdecor utilizes augmented reality technology to eliminate the retail storefront need for furniture manufacturers while improving the consumer buying experience.

CP-COMPLIANCETECH
University of Tulsa
Faculty Advisor: John Hale
Team Leader: Melissa Knauf
Team Members: Whitney Caruthers, Bryan Kinzer and Conner Sherwood
CP-ComplianceTech uses software technology to improve the efficiency of government-mandated compliance testing among power companies.

HEART OPTIC LLC
University of Central Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Maurice Haff
Team Leader: Yusuf Shurbaji
Team Member: Claye Hammock
Heart Optic LLC produces the Heart Bar™, a medical device that enables continuous CPR during image-guided procedures and ends caregiver exposure to x-ray radiation.

KEGSAFE
Oral Roberts University
Faculty Advisor: Bruno Teles
Team Leaders: Jonathan Cregor
Team Member: Derrick McCoy
KegSafe is a beer inventory system for restaurants and bars to prevent inventory theft.

LIGHTFOOT
University of Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Aaron Anglin
Team Leader: Jake Politte
Team Members: Carter Brumley, Carson Dale and Tyler Sharbutt
LightFoot is a pressure-sensing insole designed to track force excursion on the foot during exercise and prevent athletic injuries in runners. 

PROJECT PEDIATRICS
University of Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Alyssa Boutelle
Team Leaders: Krishna Manohar
Team Members: John Dastague, Nikita Hussain, Harrison Morrow and Eli Weathers
Project Pediatrics’ Mobi is a mobile vital signs monitor designed for pediatric patients that integrates seamlessly with hospital technology via wifi. 

SOMAWARE
University of Central Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Maurice Haff
Team Leader: Sam Jenkins
Team Members: Alex Drews, Christopher Pope, Nathan Robinson, Morgan Timmons and Wenxi Zeng
Somaware’s software application is designed to collect real-time patient data, allowing physical therapists to develop personalized therapeutic aid in outpatient clinics.

WEDDING VIEWS
University of Oklahoma
Faculty Advisor: Aaron Anglin
Team Leader: Keaton Ozymy
Team Members: Sarah Anderson, Brandi Brooks and Tiffany Hguyen
Wedding Views is an online platform for brides and vendors that allows brides to digitally organize information, connect with advertising vendors and view 3D renderings of their wedding.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-undergraduate-high-growth-semifinalists/feed/ 0
2016 Small Business Semifinalists http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-small-business-semifinalists/ http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-small-business-semifinalists/#respond Tue, 29 Mar 2016 20:46:59 +0000 http://i2e.org/?p=28532 AIR-EZ
East Central University
Faculty Advisor: Stacey Bolin
Team Leader: Larisa Bolin
Team Members: Caleb Large and Breanna Ragan
Air-Ez is an easily attachable electronic system that turns a typical airline seat into a safe and comfortable seat for handicapped and mobility impaired individuals. 

ALTIMETER
Oklahoma Christian University
Faculty Advisor: Russell McGuire
Team Leader: Austin McRay
Team Members: Anastasia Bubenshchikova, Kevin McGuire, Innocent Nkubito and Kyle Wood
Altimeter is a two-fold software that connects individuals and organizations with options to help them tactically and strategically accomplish or progress toward their goals.

BACK SEAT HERO
East Central University
Faculty Advisor: Stacey Bolin
Team Leader: James Brown
Back Seat Hero is a pressure-sensitive mat with indicator lights that signal the driver to a passenger’s presence in the back seat.

FRESH FUSION
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Faculty Advisor: W.M. David Hawkins
Team Leader: Jessica Tellez
Team Members: Megan Hentschke and Shane Joachims
Fresh Fusion is an organic, raw health food market/juice stop designed to encourage the consumption of healthier food choices.

PÜRE GOLF
St. Gregory’s University
Faculty Advisor: Mayda Shorney
Team Leader: Brett Kennedy
Team Members: Taylor Greteman, Smaida Mara Rizzotto and Bobby Stone
Püre Golf is a “mobile” golf facility that will arrive at your venue and provide professional club fitting, video swing analysis, high performance training and event planning for corporations and companies looking to entertain clients and employees.

ROUTE 66 ACTION CITY
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Faculty Advisor: Calvin Becker
Team Leader: Nina Burrow
Team Members: Mariam Bartlett, Hanna Chenoweth, Caleb Epperly and Madisyn Rhone
Route 66 Action City is a family-focused entertainment center committed to providing affordable entertainment and a positive environment for youth and families in Miami, Okla. and surrounding communities.

STADI-YUMM
St. Gregory’s University
Faculty Advisor: Mayda Shorney
Team Leader: Vince Rodas
Team Members: Dani Nissen, Audrey Sangare and Kylee Tatum
Stadi-Yumm is an innovative sports bar and grill that brings the stadium experience to you.

TAILORED TEXTBOOKS
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City
Faculty Advisor: Tony Smith
Team Leader: Deryl Rae Sanders
Team Members: Alec Elliott, Elora Ellison and Juan Mares
Tailored Textbooks is a platform for students to easily locate textbooks, compare prices and purchase or rent from multiple parties while also maximizing the earning potential of their used textbooks.

]]>
http://i2e.org/gov-cup-news/2016-small-business-semifinalists/feed/ 0